Banana Peanut Butter Smoothie

"Times Square's New Years Eve Ball - 1978 Technicians eye the new improved New Years ball. This version, which had halogen lamps for higher visibility, replaced a six-foot ball that had ordinary light bulbs. The lowering of the ball, which takes one minute, is down a 77-foot flagpole on top of One Times Square. (Photo by Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times Photo Archives)"

“Times Square’s New Years Eve Ball – 1978

So every year I post on New Year’s Eve, it being one tasty drink recipe.

funny-drinking-alcohol-gif-25

So here we go!

vector-clip-art-of-a-borderbanner-of-blue-coffee-cups-on-white-by-prawny-629cupsglassesdrinks

Thoughts Before Cooking:

So you know you me and smoothies, I love them! Especially as I have some bananas that need to be used before they go bad.

I found this recipe on pinterest, but it originally comes from Gimmie Some Oven

Ingredients:

  • 1 Large Banana, Peeled
  • 1 Cup of Ice Cubes
  • 1/2 Cup of Milk
  • 1/4 Cup of Greek Yogurt
  • 1 Tbsp of Peanut Butter
  • 1/2 Tsp of Vanilla Extract

Directions:

  1. In a blender, combine all ingredients.
  2. Blend until smooth and serve.

Thoughts After Cooking:

Great! A nice addition to our smoothie recipes.

For more drink recipes, go to Healthy Pumpkin Pie Smoothie

For more smoothies, go to Blueberry Earl Grey Tea Smoothie

For more pinterest recipes, go to Slow-Cooker Bread

For more holiday posts, go to Braided Candy Canes

For more New Year’s Eve posts, go to Festive Pink Lemonade

 

 

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Devil’s Food Cake Murder

Devil’s Food Cake Murder (Hannah Swensen Mystery #14) by Joanne Fluke

So it has been a while since we reviewed a Hannah Swensen Mystery. Let’s do a quick review. Hannah is an annoying baker and cookie shop owner who “investigates” murders as she is the only one in town who is “able” to.

She doesn’t work but manages to keep her shop afloat and solve crimes better than the cops. She has two boyfriends-Mike, a cop with a roving eye, who uses her for food and such; and Norman a dentist who actually cares for Hannah and wants to marry her because he loves her.

Hannah doesn’t really love either one but strings them both on as one is her picture of “manliness” and the other “sensitivity”.

Ugh!

What happened most recently is that the professor who dated Hannah when she was a student of his (but he turned out to be married) moved to Lake Eden and was murdered-Hannah having to solve the crime. Norman was also away at a conference, but when he returned, acted so weird, cold and avoiding Hannah.

He brought back his ex-fiancé, Doctor Beverly Thorndike, who Hannah hates as she wants Norman only interested in her-even though SHE can date another man. Really Hannah? As if that’s fair!

Anyways, Reverend Bob Knudson and Claire have finally been married. They went on a short two day honeymoon, as Rev. Bob couldn’t find anyone to fill in for him. However, he happens to run into childhood friend Matthew Walters, now the same denomination minister, and Rev. Matthew has volunteered to fill in for Rev. Bob so he and Claire can go on a real trip.

Everyone is excited except for Rev. Bob’s mother, Grandma Knudson. She starts to grow suspicious of Matthew and questioning if he really is who he says he is.

Why you may ask? Matthew remembers the sofa being green, when at the time he was staying with them it was red.

Gasp

Matthew as a kid had a chocolate allergy, while this Matthew has been eating Grandma Knuson’s Devil’s Food Cake nonstop.

Hmm…

Matthew says he is on a four month sabbatical, but Grandma Knudson knows that they don’t let them go for more than six weeks.

And to top it off, Matthew can sing! Ministers can’t sing well according to Grandma Knudson.

Seriously, Grandma Knudson, really? Really, Fluke?? I’m a minister’s daughter and I know tons who can sing. But whatever…

Hannah and Andrea investigate, along with trying to figure out what to do about Doctor Bev. They discover that Matthew is color blind-that explains seeing red as green. Matthew’s major is music and he was given a four month sabbatical. And yes, Matthew outgrew his allergy.

Oh well

Everyone feels great about it until Matthew’s dead body is once again found by Hannah. All are sad.

The next day Grandma Knudson and Hannah get the surprise of their lives. Rev. Matthew arrives and says the dead body is that of his almost twin-like, resembling cousin Paul.

Yes for some reason Paul pretended to be Matthew. But why? What was he after? Will Hannah find out or die trying?

Meanwhile, we end on a real cliffhanger. Apparently when Norman and Doc Bev broke up the engagement-she was pregnant. She never told him until now, and they are going to move in together so that Norman can get to know his daughter Dinah. This means that the Hannah, Mike, and Norman triangle is over.

Boom

Thoughts After Reading:

***Spoiler Alert***

Besides Grandma Knudson saving the day (priceless) I thought this book was horrible.

These characters make zero sense and just act completely unrealistic.

That ending though, Fluke shocked me with the Norman having a secret baby. I immediately went out and checked the next book out from my local library.

For more Hannah Swensen Mysteries, go to Gingerbread Cookie Murder

For more from Joanne Fluke, go to Vanilla Crackle

For more reviews, go to The President’s Daughter

The President’s Daughter

The President’s Daughter by Mariah Stewart

Washington, D.C.

December 14, 1971

A beautiful woman walks down the street, prepared to meet someone, but instead of the meeting she is hit by a car and killed.

February 2002

Simon Keller is an investigative journalist who has been hired to write a memoir about the former President Graham Hayward; a great man with a stellar record. But as he starts digging he discovers the golden egg-the President had an affair that ended in tragedy and a baby.

Dina McDermott is an attractive and independent woman who owns her own landscaping business. She has lived a quiet life, one that is interrupted when Keller’s path leads him straight to her.

But with the revelation of Dina being the president’s secret daughter comes along a killer-one who is intent on finishing the job.

Thoughts After Reading:

I thought everything with Simon was great. He was interesting, his tenacity in research, etc was fantastic. It all fell apart when the main character finds out about her true heritage. There it seemed that all the characters lost common sense and the end was too quickly sewn up.

I mean Dina was always portrayed as being smart, clever, etc but she acts SO DUMB! Her life is in DANGER and does she do anything to protect it? No she continues to “live her life the same way.”

I don’t recommend it.

For more investigative reporters, go to A Match of Wits

For more secret children, go to Death by Honeymoon

For more not in a series mysteries, go to Wuthering Heights

In other news, this is our 400th post!

For the 300th post, go to Candy from a Stranger

Braided Candy Canes

Merry Christmas!

Instead of doing another Christmas mystery, as I had a hard time finding those this year-I decided to post a Christmas recipe!

This comes from the cookbook Christmas Cookies.

Another Way to Make It:

“You can shape this dough into wreaths and attach red cinnamon candies as berries.”

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 Cup of Butter, Softened
  • 1 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Large Eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon of Vanilla Extract
  • 4 Cups of Flour
  • 1 Tablespoon of Baking Powder
  • 1/2 Teaspoon of  Baking Soda
  • 1 Egg White, Lightly Beaten
  • Red Decorator Crystals (Optional) or Cinnamon Sugar

Directions:

  1. Beat butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy.
  2. Gradually add 1 cup of sugar-beating well.
  3. Add eggs and vanilla, beating until blended.
  4. In a seperate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and baking soda.
  5. Gradually add flour mixture to butter, beating at a low speed until blended.
  6. Divide dough into fourths.
  7. Divide each portion into 14 pieces.
  8. Shape each piece into a 9-inch rope. Fold ropes in half and twist,
  9. Shape twists into candy canes, brush with egg white, and sprinkle with crystals or cinnamon sugar.
  10. Place cookies 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets.
  11. Bake at 350 degrees F for 15 mins or until the edges begin to brown.
  12. Remove to wire racks and let cool.

Thoughts After Baking:

This was kind of hard and took a few tries before I got the hang out it. The smaller cookies tasted better, in my opinion, than the larger ones.

But delicious and a great cookie to have at Christmas or give to others.

For more Christmas Cookies, go to Basic Shortbread

For more cookie recipes, go to Christmas Lace Cookies

For more dessert recipes, go to Baked Apple Slices

 

Christmas Lace Cookies

Plumpuddingmurder

Thoughts Before Cooking:

This book had a few recipes I was interested in, and this was one that sounded good and just right for Christmas.

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 Cups of Rolled Oats
  • 1/2 Cup of Melted Butter
  • 3/4 Cup of White Sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon of Baking Powder
  • 1 Teaspoon of Flour
  • 1/2 Teaspoon of Salt
  • 1.5 Teaspoons of Vanilla Extract
  • 1 Beaten Egg
  • 1/2 Cup of Chocolate Chips

Directions:

  1. Measure the oatmeal into a a medium-sized bowl.
  2. Melt the butter and pour it over the oatmeal. Stir.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the sugar, baking powder, flour, and salt. Mix well.
  4. Add the sugar mixture to the oatmeal mix and blend.
  5. Mix in the vanilla and egg.
  6. Add the chocolate chips and stir the mixture.
  7. Line cookie sheets with foil and grease lightly.
  8. Drop the cookie dough by rounded teaspoons. Don’t crowd the cookies together as they spread.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees F for 12 minutes.

Thoughts After Baking:

These were good but very buttery and greasy. They also cooked fast so watch out, or else you might burn them. But otherwise, very good.

For more Hannah Swensen recipes, go to Vanilla Crackle

For more recipes from Plum Pudding Murder, go to Christmas Cheese Rounds

For more cookie recipe, go to Basic Shortbread

For more dessert, go to Baked Apple Slices

Mail Order Murder

Ready for our next and final Christmas mystery? Here we go!

Mail Order Murder [also known as Mistletoe Murder] (Lucy Stone Mystery #1) by Leslie Meir

Thoughts before reading:

So a couple of years back I was at a library sale and they were doing a whole brown bag full of whatever for $1.00. I picked up all kinds of book, one of which was Lucy Stone #3 Trick or Treat Murder.

 

I read it and hated it, vowing to never read another one of the books again.

Then I picked up this book at the library

I loved the Lucy Stone MysteryCandy Canes of Christmas Past, as it was the perfect blend of a Christmas story, a family trying to get things together, and a mystery. It was fantastic and I absolutely adored it. It convinced me to try again.

Here we go again…

Plot Synopsis

Lucy Stone is working double time for Christmas. Besides all her normal homemaking duties, planning for Christmas, and family events-she works at night at the mail-order company, Country Cousins.

One night she is taking some air, and as she is walking hears a strange noise outside. When she goes to investigate it, she finds Sam Miller, owner of Country Cousins dead!

What?!

As she continues to work and prepare for Christmas, she decides to try her hand at sleuthing-even going as far as putting an ad in a newspaper to see who killed Sam.

Will this be a Christmas to remember? Or will it a Christmas in which the present is death?

Thoughts After Reading:

I hated it.

Ugh!

Lucy does like zero real investigating “falling into” the answer more than anything else. And the way it ends? Blah.

Hated it and I am not looking forward to reading the rest of the series. It was boring, bland, and I give it one star. Plus Lucy does a lot of stupid things in this book. Most definitely not a real detective or does any detective work.

The mystery moves so slooooooooooooowly. It really is just about Lucy’s holiday drama until the last few pages where everything is solved in a few moments.

For more Lucy Stone Mysteries, go to Candy Canes of Christmas Past

For more Christmas mysteries, go to Death by Desire

For more mystery reviews, go to Wuthering Heights

Slow-Cooker Bread

This comes from my sister blog, JaneAustenRunsMyLife.wordpress.com

I love bread. I could eat it, non-stop.

So you probably saw this pic on facebook/instagram, about me making bread. Usually bread takes quite a bit of time, but my friend shared this post on pinterest with me about making bread in your crock-pot!

Huh?

It was delicious and easy, so I felt I should share. It originally comes from delish.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 Envelope of Active Dry Yeast
  • 1 Tbsp of Sugar
  • 1.5 Cups of Lukewarm Water
  • 3.5 Cups of Flour
  • 2 Tbsp of Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Tsp of Salt

Directions:

  1. Line a crock-pot with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, combine yeast and sugar.
  3. Add water and stir until combined.
  4. Add flour, olive oil, and salt; stir until combined and a shaggy dough begins to form.
  5. On a lightly floured surface, knead dough until it becomes smooth and soft, about 5 mins.
  6. Roll dough into a ball, then place in a slow cooker.
  7. Cook on high until golden brown and cooked through, about 2 hrs.
  8. Carefully remove bread from slow cooker.
  9. To crisp up the crust, transfer bread to a baking sheet and broil until golden, 2-3 mins.
  10. Let cool for 20 mins and serve warm or at room temp.

So delicious!!!!

For more pinterest recipes, go to Healthy Pumpkin Pie Smoothie

For more bread recipes, go to Caraway Rye Bread

For more slow cooker recipes, go to Crock-Pot Potato & Kielbasa Chowder

Death by Desire

Ready for our next Christmas mystery?

Death by Desire (Caribbean Murder #4) by Jaden Skye

This time Cindy and Mattheus head to St. Bart’s a few days before Christmas. A senator’s daughter, Tiffaney, disappeared from her engagement party and wound up dead on the beach.

As they delve into the case they meet Tiffaney’s boisterous and demanding father; an obsessed and controlling mother, Tiffaney’s twin who hated her guts, a fiancé that is the complete opposite and depressed, Tiffaney’s strange soon-to-be parents-in-law, a Russian mogul who wants to take the Senator down, and the rest of the fancy, conniving, secret-filled crowd they spend time with.

As they continue they discover there is much more to Tiffaney than what met the eye. Drugs, lovers, and lots of secrets and hidden pieces to this case.

Thoughts After Reading:

I didn’t care for it. Poor storyline and grammar.

Ugh!

Cindy and Mattheus were very annoying with each other-Mattheus seemed to belittle and ignore Cindy. The ending was  dumb, the villain picked almost at random and everything too easily wrapped up with a “twist”. And they pretty much copied Laura’s character from Twin Peaks

For more Caribbean Murder Mysteries, go to Death by Marriage

For more Jayden Skye, go to Death by Divorce

For more Christmas mysteries, go to Wuthering Heights

Basic Shortbread

This comes from my sister blog JaneAustenRunsMyLife.wordpress.comI just reblogged it from her.

Thoughts Before Cooking:

This recipe comes from my a book I received for Christmas one year, Christmas Cookies.

Background on the Cookie:

“Shortbread is made with a few basic ingredients, and the results are sensational. The key to success with this thick shortbread is baking it slowly so it doesn’t brown.”

Ingredients:

  • 1 Cup of Butter, Softened
  • 1/2 Cup of Sugar
  • 1/4 Teaspoon of Vanilla Extract
  • 2 1/4 Cups of Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/8 Teaspoon of Salt

Directions:

  1. Beat the butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating well.
  2. Stir in vanilla.
  3. Combine flour and salt, gradually add to the butter mixture beating on low speed until blended.
  4. Roll dough to 1/2 inch thickness on a lightly floured surface.
  5. Cut with a 2.5 inch round cutter or Christmas cookie cutter.
  6. Place 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.
  7. Bake at 275 degrees F for 50 minutes or until bottoms begin to brown.
  8. Cool 2 minutes on a baking shet; remove to wire rack to cool.

Thoughts After Baking:

These were delicious and so buttery good.  perfect compliment to tea, Christmas, or anytime/anything. 🙂

For more Christmas Cookies, go to Aunt Neal’s Old-Fashioned Tea Cakes

For more cookie recipes, go to Fresh Mint Chocolate Chip Cookies

For more dessert, go to Baked Apple Slices

Wuthering Heights

So this year it has been really hard to find Christmas themed mysteries. I’m starting off with this one as it does have a ghost and mystery of what happened, the main character wanting to know more and the whole story. It also has a Christmas scene in it, so it counts.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

I know it is unusual but there is a Christmas scene so it does count!

I love Wuthering Heights, it has always been one of my favorite books. I used to be in love with Heathcliff.

So the book has one of the best beginnings ever. A man, Mr. Lockwood, has been renting a house in the country as he wants to get away from everyone and everything.

However, he realizes that the hermit life is not cut out for him. He visits with his landlord, finding him hospitable, if a little brusque. He decides to surprise him one day and visit and finds his host angry-the house Wuthering Heights to be very unhappy. Mr. Heathcliff is angry, there is a Mrs. Catherine Heathcliff who is also angry and says she is a witch, Haerton Earnshaw who is an illiterate Neanderthal, and Joseph a grumpy hand. The snow keeps him from leaving and he has to stay the night.

Mr. Lockwood is goes to a room no one uses, it has been untouched for years. He finds himself unable to fall asleep and stays up reading a diary by Catherine Earnshaw, who lived in that room. Then we have one of the spookiest, chillingest, best writings:

I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement. The hook was soldered into the staple: a circumstance observed by me when awake, but forgotten. ‘I must stop it, nevertheless!’ I muttered, knocking my knuckles through the glass, and stretching an arm out to seize the importunate branch; instead of which, my fingers closed on the fingers of a little, ice-cold hand! The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, ‘Let me in—let me in!’ ‘Who are you?’ I asked, struggling, meanwhile, to disengage myself. ‘Catherine Linton,’ it replied, shiveringly (why did I think of Linton? I had read Earnshaw twenty times for Linton) ‘I’m come home: I’d lost my way on the moor!’ As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child’s face looking through the window. Terror made me cruel; and, finding it useless to attempt shaking the creature off, I pulled its wrist on to the broken pane, and rubbed it to and fro till the blood ran down and soaked the bedclothes: still it wailed, ‘Let me in!’ and maintained its tenacious gripe, almost maddening me with fear. ‘How can I!’ I said at length. ‘Let me go, if you want me to let you in!’ The fingers relaxed, I snatched mine through the hole, hurriedly piled the books up in a pyramid against it, and stopped my ears to exclude the lamentable prayer. I seemed to keep them closed above a quarter of an hour; yet, the instant I listened again, there was the doleful cry moaning on! ‘Begone!’ I shouted. ‘I’ll never let you in, not if you beg for twenty years.’ ‘It is twenty years,’ mourned the voice: ‘twenty years. I’ve been a waif for twenty years!’ Thereat began a feeble scratching outside, and the pile of books moved as if thrust forward. I tried to jump up; but could not stir a limb; and so yelled aloud, in a frenzy of fright. To my confusion, I discovered the yell was not ideal: hasty footsteps approached my chamber door; somebody pushed it open, with a vigorous hand, and a light glimmered through the squares at the top of the bed. I sat shuddering yet, and wiping the perspiration from my forehead: the intruder appeared to hesitate, and muttered to himself. At last, he said, in a half-whisper, plainly not expecting an answer, ‘Is any one here?’ I considered it best to confess my presence; for I knew Heathcliff’s accents, and feared he might search further, if I kept quiet. With this intention, I turned and opened the panels. I shall not soon forget the effect my action produced.

Heathcliff stood near the entrance, in his shirt and trousers; with a candle dripping over his fingers, and his face as white as the wall behind him. The first creak of the oak startled him like an electric shock: the light leaped from his hold to a distance of some feet, and his agitation was so extreme, that he could hardly pick it up.

‘It is only your guest, sir,’ I called out, desirous to spare him the humiliation of exposing his cowardice further. ‘I had the misfortune to scream in my sleep, owing to a frightful nightmare. I’m sorry I disturbed you.’

A ghost of Catherine Earnshaw Linton.

Mr. Lockwood heads home and falls ill. He questions the housekeeper Nelly about Heathcliff and she tells them the story:

So Mrs. Earnshaw died years ago and left the gentry Mr. Earnshaw with a son, Hindley, and daughter, Catherine. Mr. Earnshaw was very abusive and so are his children-wild-like the weather on the moors.

They are like storms

Nelly lived in the house as well, taken in by Mr. Earnshaw. One day everyone’s life changed when Mr. Earnshaw returned home with a boy! A curly-hair, dark-skin (most likely Spanish, Italian, or Russian) and raises him with the family. He hates his own son and lifts up Heathcliff. 

Nelly, Hindley, and Catherine all hate him on sight. They pinch, hurt, annoy, accuse, etc.; him-although Catherine ends up growing to like him. Soon Catherine and Heathcliff are thick as thieves and never want to spend any time apart from each other.

Mr. Earnshaw dies, and Hindley becomes the head of the household. He abuses both his sister and Heathcliff, taking no interest at all in how they are raised. Catherine is a gentry daughter, a lady, but she is actually more like a wild animal-no instruction in becoming a lady.

Hindley marries a very simple. childlike woman who dies in childbirth. He then hates his son, becomes an alcoholic, and is even more abusive.

Oh no!

Catherine and Heathcliff’s relationship is changed when one day she gets injured and taken in by the Linton family. There she learns how to pretend to be ladylike-still wild and crazy and abusive when things aren’t her way. 

Even though she loves Heathcliff she will not marry him. She will not chain herself to a man who has no family, no last name, he can’t do or become anything. She marries Edgar Linton and Heathcliff runs away. 

When he returns years later he comes to get his revenge on all-He will take Wuthering Heights and his son from the high and mighty Hindley, get revenge and hurt Edgar, and lastly-break Catherine’s heart like she broke his…

Thoughts After Reading:

So Wuthering Heights is a book about passion, not just passion but unbridled passion. All these characters do whatever feels right to them, without thinking of what may come with their actions or the price they or other will pay for their passion.

Often the Bronte’s books are compared with Jane Austen’s. Austen’s books take place more inside sitting rooms, while the Bronte’s on the moors. The Bronte’s are much darker than Austen work’s playing with similar themes but much deeper.

The term wuthering means decaying, blustery, turbulent, etc-the personalities being wuthering as much as the house, and as wild as the moors they reside.

I have always loved this book, but it was hard to read as what I had gone through with my husband. He abused me in many ways, like Heathcliff and Catherine do to each other and others. I understand how Heathcliff feels-with no last name and known family-he is essentially without a social security card and has no way of really doing anything. However, because he is hurt he then hurts others-and no matter what happened to him that behavior is never okay.

Cathy is just as abusive and very conniving. With her brother as her guardian she knows she will meet no one and grabs at Edgar to get away-bringing pain and destruction and heartbreak to him.

“Edgar Linton, as multitudes have been before, and will be after him. was infatuated: and believed himself to be the happiest man alive on the day he led her to Gimmerton Chapel…”

I know how that feels, and how it feels to discover you are 100% wrong and the person you married crazy. After the abuse I suffered from my husband I defintely do not sympathize with Heathcliff as much as I do Mr. Rochester. I too married a crazy person who tried to kill me.

It still is a good story and one I recommend reading in your lifetime.

Now a while back I reviewed The Madwoman Upstairs, by Catherine Lowell, she says that the only reason that the abusive horrible Mr. Earnshaw would adopt Heathcliff and treat him good was because he was his illegitimate son-making the reason why Catherine won’t marry Heathcliff because of incest. But I don’t believe it is true. Mr. Earnshaw “adopts” Nelly and brings her into his home. If he did that and treated her well and she is of no relation, why not Heathcliff? Plus he probably likes the savageness of Heathcliff, as it made him think of himself more than his “pansy” son.

Boom

Still a worthwhile read with so many great quotes-still a favorite no matter what, just not while I’m healing.

For more on Wuthering Heights go to,The Madwoman Upstairs

For more classic literature, go to The Sign of the Four

For more Christmas mysteries, go to The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

For more ghosts, go to Christina’s Ghost

On a sad note, given the context of this book I wanted to add this:

Are you being abused?

It’s abuse when someone who should care about you does or says things that hurt you or make you feel afraid, helpless or worthless. Here are only a few examples:

  • Slapping, hitting, punching, choking, grabbing, shoving, kicking you or your kids, your pets
  • Threatening you, your kids, friends, family or pets
  • Hitting, kicking, slamming walls, doors, furniture, possessions
  • Forcing you to have sex
  • Calling you names, swearing at you, yelling
  • Controlling all the money, even money you earn
  • Blaming you or your kids for everything
  • Putting you down, making you feel like nothing you do is ever good enough
  • Treating you like a servant or slave
  • Controlling where you go, what you do, what you wear
  • Controlling who you see, who you talk to
  • Humiliating you in front of other people
  • Refusing to let you leave the relationship

If you are in danger call 911, a local hotline, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.